036: Using Low-Dose Naltrexone (LDN) For Chronic Skin Rash Conditions w/ Dr. Leonard Weinstock

Naltrexone was originally used to help opioid addicts in their recovery process, because it prevents people from experiencing the high of the drug. Now, Low-Dose Naltrexone (LDN) is being used in novel ways: to help with inflammation, autoimmune conditions, and chronic skin rashes.

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Today's guest, Dr. Leonard Weinstock, is Board Certified in Gastroenterology and Internal Medicine. He is an Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine and Surgery at Washington University School of Medicine and has a private practice.

Dr. Weinstock is an active lecturer and has published more than 85 articles, abstracts, editorials and book chapters. He is researching the role of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and mast cell activation syndrome in a variety of syndromes.

In this episode, we talk about the use of LDN in the treatment of chronic skin conditions such as psoriasis.

Have you been prescribed LDN for a chronic skin rash? Tell us in the comments!

In this episode

  • Thoughts on addressing adult acne from a more holistic perspective
  • Why you have to look at your hormones if you've used birth control pills to control acne
  • What is LDN?
  • How can LDN help people with psoriasis, rosacea, and other skin conditions?
  • Potential side effects of LDN
  • How well does the body typically tolerate it?
  • Do you have to be on LDN for life to be symptom-free?
  • Has LDN ever been used in people with eczema or seborrheic dermatitis?

 

Quotes

“As far as tolerability of the medicine: If you go up very slowly, our ability to get people to the full anti-inflammatory dose of 4.5mg is actually quite good. So I think that the issues of insomnia and GI side effects can be diminished just by starting at 1mg and gradually increasing it every four to seven days.” [9:44]

“An autoimmune condition is rarely reversed by diet.” [11:57]

“This is a drug that is FDA-approved, but it's off-label when it's used for low doses.” [15:11]

 

Links

Find Dr. Weinstock online here

LDNresearchtrust.org

My first interview with Dr. Weinstock about the SIBO-Rosacea connection

ACNE RESOURCES

Dr. Jolene Brighten's episode

Beyond The Pill book by Dr. Brighten

Brie Wieselman's first episode

Brie Wieselman's second episode

Melissa Gallico's episode

Dr. Carrie Jones

 

“As far as tolerability of the medicine: If you go up very slowly, our ability to get people to the full anti-inflammatory dose of 4.5mg is actually quite good. So I think that the issues of insomnia and GI side effects can be diminished just by starting at 1mg and gradually increasing it every four to seven days.”