077: Aloe Juice & Itch Relief

Can aloe help quell the itch and reduce histamines? Some say yes!

There are a number of reasons that people can experience super itchy skin. The most common assumption is high histamines which often drives someone to try a low histamine diet.

Histamine isn’t always the root cause — issues like hidden infections and high estrogen can also play a role.

But if you find that your anti-histamine isn’t cutting it, you may want to test out aloe juice to see if you can get some itch relief.

Here’s the details and how to give it a try!

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In this episode:

  • Aloe can be soothing to the skin and gut
  • Antihistamine properties of Aloe Juice
  • Recommended brand of aloe juice
  • How to take it (to avoid getting diarrhea)
  • Medication interactions with Aloe

Quotes:

A lot of people know of aloe for its topical benefits for concerns like burns. It’s so easy to crack open a leaf from the aloe plan and spread the gel inside the leaf over your skin. It's also considered to be a remedy for things like hives and itching because it is a natural anti-histamine.

There’s a surprising number of nutrients in Aloe such as vitamins, minerals, fatty acids, and even 20 of 22 amino acids! Health properties include antiseptic properties, anti-inflammatory, and improved collagen production in the area of a wound.

Aloe Vera Juice

Can Aloe Juice Help Reduce Itching? (FULL TRANSCRIPT)

Welcome to Episode #77 of the Healthy Skin Show!

In today’s episode, I want to talk to you about Aloe Vera juice and how it might be helpful if itchy skin is a problem for you.

Aloe is a common house plant. A lot of people know of aloe for its topical benefits for concerns like burns. It’s so easy to crack open a leaf from the aloe plan and spread the gel inside the leaf over your skin.

However, it's considered to be a natural remedy for things like hives and itching because it is a natural anti-histamine.

Another lesser known fact about Aloe is that it can be soothing when consumed orally to the gastrointestinal tract and has a laxative effect. It can be helpful to get bowel movements moving along if you're more constipated.

However, it’s not a good idea for someone with loose stools or diarrhea.

Since I know many people have concerns about salicylates, you should know that aloe is high in salicylates. If you have an issue with salicylate-rich foods, you don’t have a gut issue. You have a liver detoxification issue that requires additional glycine and vitamin B6.

If you've got super itchy skin and use a lot of anti-histamines, it’s pretty common to ask what else you can do to reduce your need on anti-histamine medications.

There are certainly different types of natural options that can help quell histamine response like stinging nettles and quercitin.

But most people don’t think of the anti-histamine properties of aloe vera.

Aloe plant

What Is Aloe?

Aloe is a shrubby plant a part of the Liliaceae family that typically grows in dry climates.

You’re probably familiar with it as a common houseplant available at pretty much any gardening center.

There’s a surprising number of nutrients in Aloe such as vitamins, minerals, fatty acids, and even 20 of 22 amino acids!

This plant has a number of really interesting properties including antiseptic properties, anti-inflammatory, and improved collagen production in the area of a wound. The laxative effect I’ve mentioned is due to anthraquinones found in the plant.

And there has been some research around uses in seborrheic dermatitis and psoriasis vulgaris.

While allergies to Aloe aren’t common, it is possible to react (though it is uncommon). Especially if you have an allergy to the Liliaceae family of plants which includes lilies and tulips.

Aloe is commonly know as a gel which is applied topically. However in this specific instance, we’re looking at the juice of the plant, NOT the gel.

Aloe plant

Aloe Vera For Anti-Histamine Support

Here's how you can incorporate Aloe Vera juice into your life as part of your protocol and test it out to see if it works for you.

I already mentioned that Aloe can have a laxative effect which is based on the quantity that you consume. Even if you’re more constipated, consuming too much will also trigger diarrhea.

So more is not better when it comes to consuming Aloe.

That’s why you have to be cautious with testing this out.

No one wants diarrhea and it’s not good for your gut.

To get started, find organic aloe juice that has no sugar added to it.

One brand that I typically recommend to clients is from Lakewood Organics. I’m sure there are other acceptable aloe juices available.

You’ll also find that there are different forms of Aloe juice. My experience is only whole leaf Aloe. The one from Lakewood Organics is only Aloe and lemon juice.

(FYI — This post is not sponsored and I have no relationship with the company in case you were wondering.)

There is no sugar in it and only two grams of carbs! This is helpful if you have gut dysbiosis or candida. You’re not feeding unfriendly gut bugs by consuming something labeled as “juice.”

This brand is readily available in natural food stores and other grocery stores. You can also purchase it on Amazon.

I recommend finding one that doesn’t have any added sugar and no preservatives such as potassium benzoate.

Glass of aloe water

How To Add Aloe Juice To Support Itchy Skin Rashes

Try starting with ⅛ cup of aloe juice per day in the morning and in the evening around dinner time.

If you feel any improvement (and you're not experiencing loose stools after two or three days), try increasing it to ¼ cup in the morning and at dinner time.

Gastrointestinal symptoms such as cramping and diarrhea indicate that you would need to reduce or stop taking the aloe juice.

If there’s no improvement, discuss how much you should take with your practitioner because of the laxative effective which can impact electrolyte balance.

You can add aloe juice to your daily protein shake as well.

Preparing aloe to make juice

Aloe Side Effects

Nothing is free of side effects and interactions… even aloe! There are some interactions with medications that you should be aware of.

Though this isn’t about the topical use of aloe, be aware that aloe increases the absorption of topical steroid cream through the skin.

Also avoid aloe latex and whole-leaf extracts taken orally. If you have Crohn’s, Ulcerative Colitis, bowel obstructions, kidney disease, hemorrhoids, and before and directly after surgery should avoid aloe juice.

Obviously if you have any concerns, you should always talk to your doctor or medical practitioner before trying out aloe juice (and any natural remedies).

Taking aloe juice orally can interact with the following:

  • Diabetic medication (potentially causing hypoglycemia)
  • Digoxin
  • Sevoflurane
  • Laxatives
  • Warfarin (Coumadin)
  • Diuretic medications (aka. Water Pills)

It may be safe for kids to try. Speak with your pediatrician first to make sure that it's safe for your child.

If you're pregnant or nursing, definitely talk to your doctor first before consuming Aloe Vera. Pregnant and breastfeeding can complicate matters when it comes to medications, natural remedies, and supplements.

I personally know just how awful itching can be, and that's why tips like this may be helpful for you and could be worth a try.

If you've got any questions or comments or an experience with aloe juice that you'd love to share, leave your comments below so that we can keep the conversation going.

If you know somebody who's really struggling with itchy skin, this may be helpful. It isn't a root cause fix, but it's nice to have tools along the way that you can use to help yourself be more comfortable.

Woman checking for references in library

REFERENCES:

https://www.allergicliving.com/experts/can-aloe-vera-make-your-skin-break-out-in-a-rash/

https://www.britannica.com/plant/Liliaceae

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2763764/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2763764/

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/318591.php

https://www.rxlist.com/aloe/supplements.htm

There’s a surprising number of nutrients in Aloe such as vitamins, minerals, fatty acids, and even 20 of 22 amino acids!